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Reviewing Your Plans After Retirement

Now that you have retired, you need to ask yourself some vital questions. These questions sort of help you examine your position and how well your plans for your retirement are playing out. Irrespective of how long you’ve been retired, these questions still help you to determine how far you’ve come and if there are still some areas left to revisit.

To do that, some questions you need to ask yourself are:

1. How well am I doing?

In essence, this is an inquiry into how you are doing concerning your retirement goals at the moment. This helps you determine if you are taking the right steps concerning your retirement goals. Is where you currently are where you planned to be upon retirement?

When you were preparing for your retirement, you surely had an idea of how you expected your retirement years to be. Are you there yet? If you planned to get a beach house for your retirement, is that where you are living at the moment? Are there places you planned to visit upon retirement?  If you review these goals and realise you are not close to your retirement life, what then do you think the problem is?

An inquiry into how you are doing concerning your retirement goals help you determine if you are taking the right steps concerning your retirement goals.

2. Is my retirement life boring?

You no longer have to wake up early to prepare for work and that gives you so much time on your hands. But, are you bored? What are you doing with the free time?  When planning for retirement, you were probably looking forward to the idea of watching your favourite TV shows or going to a beach.

However, that might get boring with time, especially if you had an early retirement. The absence of any definite schedule or well-defined responsibility may result in boredom or depression for most retirees. If you were without a plan when you retired, or if the plan you had seemed like a good idea then but now that you have retired you no longer find it satisfying, then you should consider mapping out a new plan. If the old gets boring, now might be the appropriate time to pick up new interests and get more socially interactive.

3. Has anything changed?

Upon retirement, your major preoccupation isn’t with working or saving, and it is now more with relaxing as well as spending. It is no longer about other people, but more about yourself. In the early years of retirement, you might have done well to travel to different places where you planned to go, but now you will rather stay at home. With changes and new additions to your family in the form of your grandkids, your interests may start changing and turning towards a different course. Based on those new interests you may have to revisit your expectations.

4. How is your health?

Your health is a significant determinant of how you feel and how well you can enjoy your retirement. Check yourself to see if you are eating and exercising well and if you are keeping up with your doctors’ appointment and going for regular checkups. You no longer have any excuse not to meet up with your doctors’ appointment or exercise now that you have time, so are you doing just that?

5.  Are your finances springing any surprise?

The absence of any definite schedule or well-defined responsibility may result in boredom or depression for most retirees

As you planned for your retirement, you most likely had the tiniest idea how your daily expenses would be and then the occasional costs and treats. Based on that, you made a plan to help you strike a balance between your expected income and your expenses. However, unplanned things happen all the time. If for instance a huge medical cost come up or you have to improve your home, you might have to reduce some of those discretionary expenses. The surprises may also come from the part of your adult children or even ageing parents which might disrupt your initial plan.

6. Importantly, do you have to change your course?

Now that you have retired and probably ticked some things off your bucket list, you might discover that you are open to new ideas. In fact, some of those old ideas might have become less interesting, and you need something new and different.

You should know that change is a constant thing, and whether or not you have been retired for five months or five years, change remains inevitable. Therefore, it is sometimes advisable that we remain open to the idea of re-evaluating and re-considering if you still want to go down a particular path you planned for retirement or if you are ready to change course.

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